Wednesday, 19 January 2011

The christianization of people of The Western Roman Empire carved in a 12th Century San Vicente, Avila, Spain

12th century cenotaph carving in San Vicente, Avila Flickr Photo by d0gwalker, 2010. This is a detail from the Romanesque church monument of three Saints Vicente, Sabina and Cristeta. It is from San Vicente, Avila, Castilla y Leon in Spain.

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Basílica de los Santos Hermanos Mártires. Photo by Outisnn, 2009.

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Avila iglesia San Vicente cenotafio martires. Photo by Lourdes Cardenal, 2009.

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Avila Basilica San Vicente,interiores (Sepulcro de los Santos). Photo by Zarateman, 2010.

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Avila iglesia san Vicente cenotafio martires. Photo by Lourdes Cardenal, 2009.

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Avila iglesia San Vicente cenotafio martires. Photo by Lourdes Cardenal, 2009. Pay attention to the snake around his neck.

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Basílica de los Santos Hermanos Mártires. Photo by Outisnn, 2009.

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Avila iglesia San Vicente cenotafio martires. Photo by Lourdes Cardenal, 2009.

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Avila iglesia San Vicente cenotafio martires construyendo iglesia. Photo by Lourdes Cardenal, 2009.

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Avila iglesia San Vicente cenotafio martires. Photo by Lourdes Cardenal, 2009.

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Avila iglesia San Vicente cenotafio martires. Photo by Lourdes Cardenal, 2009.

The Christian people came from Eastern Europe and Byzantine.

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Basílica de los Santos Hermanos Mártires, photo by Outisnn, 2009.

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Avila iglesia San Vicente cenotafio martires. Photo by Lourdes Cardenal, 2009.

- A well told story - We are all free to interpret this story as we like - for me this is not about self-chosen martyrdom - it is about the suffering and murdering of the ancient people in Western-Europe through the process of Christianization. Even though it was relatively long-lasting, it started really much later than we previously have been told. Paganism was well-established in the minds of the Western-Europeans.

The last two photos are examples how the christian crusaders in the end made God in their own image and hung up and crucified “the disicple of the pagans” (which did not really fit their image or religion). You can see him hanging beneath the depiction of the blonde God. These people came from Christian Byzantium (or the later Eastern Roman Empire), they migrated westwards through Europe in the medieval period when Islam continuously had expanded in Eastern Europe. They destroyed much of the old Indo-European art in their crusade, and filled Europe with marble statues made in their own images. It is a wonder that this monument was allowed to “survive”, it clearly shows the ancient Indo-Europeans. A likely explanation for why it is kept is the fact that it in some ways represents a documentation or a monument of the christians own victory.

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